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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Improving the understanding, detection, and management of kidney disease.

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Kidney Health Corner

In addition to the National Kidney Sundays event, we will be co-hosting a Question and Answer Chat with Dr. Rodgers on the Blackdoctor.org Facebook page. If you have questions about kidney disease and its connection to high blood pressure and diabetes, please join us on Thursday, March 14 at 10am!

Did you help coordinate or plan to coordinate a Kidney Sundays event? We want to feature your story here! Send us an email with your name, the number of people you involved, and tell us a little bit about your event. Email us: nkdep@info.niddk.nih.gov

How are you acknowledging National Kidney Month? Head over to our Make the Kidney Connection Facebook page to tell us what you've done to educate your friends and loved ones this month! We may feature your story in a future post.

March 26 is Diabetes Alert Day. Find out if you and your loved ones are at risk for type 2 diabetes by taking the Diabetes Risk Test and talking to your family about your family's history of diabetes.

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National Kidney Month 2013: 16 Cities and 46 Faith Communities Rally for Kidney Sundays

On March 3, the National Kidney Disease Education Program's National Kidney Sundays event reached more than 46,000 congregants around the country.

Now in its second year, Kidney Sundays events were held in seven new cities including Chicago, New York City, St. Petersburg, Florida, and cities throughout South Carolina. See the full list of cities and churches.

Chi Eta Phi Nursing Sorority and the American Diabetes Association's Project POWER were again instrumental in bringing the National Kidney Sundays event to life. In addition to our national partners, health champions from across the country joined the effort to bring kidney health information to faith communities.

"Kidney Sundays provides a great opportunity to talk about kidney disease, its risk factors, and African Americans' risk for the disease," said Dr. Karla Robinson, a Charlotte-based family practice physician and kidney health champion. Dr. Robinson hosted a Kidney Sundays event at Have Life Ministries for the second year. "What's really important is that it allows us one-on-one time with church members to talk about their concerns and offer resources to those who may need them."

Kidney Sundays isn't just for National Kidney Month!

If you'd like to learn more about the Kidney Sundays program and want to get your faith community involved, visit http://nkdep.nih.gov/get-involved/kidney-connection/kidney-sundays.shtml to download the Kidney Sundays Toolkit.

How Does Kidney Disease Impact the African American Community?

This National Kidney Month, NKDEP developed an infographic (or visual) to help us explain how African Americans are affected by kidney disease in the United States. Check out the infographic below and visit our Make the Kidney Connection Facebook page to share it with your Facebook friends.

It is estimated that nearly one in six African Americans has signs of kidney disease

Page last updated: February 27, 2013