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U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Improving the understanding, detection, and management of kidney disease.

A woman learns about kidney disease.

Learn About
Kidney Disease

Diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular (heart or blood vessel) disease, and a family history of kidney failure are the key risk factors for chronic kidney disease. If you or a family member have any of these risk factors, it is important to learn about the basics of kidney disease and how to keep the kidneys healthier longer.

What you should know about kidney disease:

  • Early kidney disease has no signs or symptoms.
  • Kidney disease usually does not go away.
  • Kidney disease can be treated. The earlier you know you have it, the better.
  • Blood and urine tests are used to check for kidney disease.
  • Kidney disease can progress to kidney failure.

Kidney Disease Basics »

Kidney disease is a condition in which the kidneys are damaged and/or cannot filter blood normally.

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At Risk for Kidney Disease? »

Diabetes and high blood pressure are the leading causes of kidney disease. Other factors include cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) disease and family history of kidney failure. Find out more about kidney disease risk factors. Also, learn how some racial and ethnic groups are more affected by kidney failure than other groups.

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Keep Your Kidneys Healthy »

If you are at risk for kidney disease, there are steps you can take to keep your kidneys healthy.

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Testing for Kidney Disease »

Early kidney disease has no signs or symptoms. Learn about simple blood and urine tests that are used to check your kidney health.

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Can't find what you're looking for? »

For information on other types of kidney disease or kidney-related issues, such as polycystic kidney disease or kidney stones, please visit the National Clearinghouse on Kidney and Urologic Disease website or the frequently searched terms on Additional Kidney Information.

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Resources for Families and Communities

Page last updated: March 5, 2014